The UU Media Collaborative, it works…

UU Media Collaborative - Dragonfly - Sept 19, 2012

Yesterday a few of us launched a new project on Facebook, a group called “The UU Media Collaborative.”  The group is described as follows:

The UU Media Collaborative is a space for Unitarian Universalists to collaborate on the production of freely available and sharable visual graphics, images, videos and other resources. We hope to encourage collaborations between UU graphic designers, photographers, videographers, graphic artists and other creative minds. Interested in sharing the ideals of Unitarian Universalism visually? Join us!
Coming together in a new spirit of collaboration, members started sharing resources for free stock photos,  then sources for UU quotes.   Then POW!  The following UU Media Collaborative works resulted.   We’ll be figuring out a vehicle for making the groups works easy to follow and share, with clear use guidelines. UPDATE: We’ve launched a Facebook page for sharing images created by the UU Media Collaborative. Like to get new content you can share with your congregation and beyond!
You may join the group at  http://www.facebook.com/groups/uumedia
Get content via Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/UUMedia

UU Media Collaborative - Ballet Sept 19, 2012

Occupy Your Faith – A Boston Unitarian Universalist Revival

Event announcement via Matt Meyer. “Please pass it along to everyone you know!  Pass it along to youth group leaders and youth, friends and family, choir members and musicians, clergy and college students!  The RSVP will let us know how much food to get and how much help we’ll need with childcare.”

Boston UU Revival on May 12th!
Join us for a service of song, story, and reflection.
4-6pm.  Dinner to follow

Music by: Matt Meyer, Mark David Buckles,
and “The Music Committee,” a contemporary UU band.
$15 suggested donation.
An offering for the UU Urban Ministry will be taken.

Childcare Available
RSVP HERE



Occupy Your Faith
A Boston Unitarian Universalist Revival

Join us for an energetic service of song, story, and reflection as we share in a celebration of the transforming message of Unitarian Universalism.

Saturday, May 12th
Worship begins at 4pm, with a shared dinner to follow at 6pm.
RSVP HERE

Childcare will be available

At the UU Urban Ministry
10 Putnam st. in Roxbury
 
<10 min walk from Roxbury Crossing T stop

Music by: Matt Meyer, Mark David Buckles, and “The Music Committee” a contemporary UU band.
Suggested donation of $15.
A free-will offering will also be taken for the UU Urban Ministry of Boston.

Reflections on Ministry UUA Video Series

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In this video series from the Unitarian Universalist Association,  religious professionals reflect on Unitarian Universalist ministry in all its forms.  Each video ranges from 2 to 4 minutes.  According to the Rev. Harlan Limpert, UUA Vice President for Ministries and Congregational Support Administration,  the last videos in the series will be released over the next two weeks.  If you don’t see your video here, stay tuned! ~ Peter

Unitarian Universalist Ministry – What do you love about ministry?
Updated version – 12/12/2011

Unitarian Universalist (UU) ministers respond to the question, “What do you love about ministry”? In two minutes and six seconds, ten current UU ministers describe what they love about being in ministry. Very moving.

Unitarian Universalist Ministry – What are the challenges of ministry?

Unitarian Universalist ministers respond to the question, “What are the challenges of ministry?” Five UU ministers describe briefly the challenges of being in ministry.

Unitarian Universalist Ministry – What is the core of your calling?

Five Unitarian Universalist ministers talk about the core of their calling.

Unitarian Universalist Ministry – How is your ministry transformative?

Four Unitarian Universalist ministers talk about how their ministries are transformative.

Unitarian Universalist Ministry – How possible is work-life balance?

Six Unitarian Universalist religious professionals talk about whether it’s possible to find work-life balance in their ministries.

Unitarian Universalist Ministry – So you think you have a calling?

Five Unitarian Universalist provide advice to those who think they may have a calling for ministry.

What questions should you ask yourself about ministry

What questions should you ask when considering the ministry.
Five UU music professionals talk about their music ministries.

Unitarian Universalist Ministry – The ministry of military chaplaincy.

A Unitarian Universalist minister and active Navy chaplain shares the joys and challenges of military chaplaincy.

Three Unitarian Universalist ministers of color reflect on their ministries.

Surveys and thoughts on Freerange UUs

A new survey for freerange UUs has just been created by the UUA’s Office of Growth Strategies.  I hope you’ll share this with your friends, colleagues and congregation at large.

Here’s the survey announcement:

Seeking Free-Range Unitarian Universalists…
by Tandi Rogers
If you’re a “Free-Range Unitarian Universalist,” please take this survey: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/FreeRangeUUs. The UUA Office of Growth Strategies is seeking to better understand Unitarian Universalism outside our congregations. Help me transform the way we live into our faith. If you’re active in a congregation, but know people who aren’t, but identify as Unitarian Universalist, please pass this on to them. Thank you!!  In faith, Tandi

From a growth perspective,  I think figuring out how to cultivate (not control) a larger Unitarian Universalist movement is critical.   Often I hear people using the words movement and religion interchangeably.  They are very different. A few thoughts on that in older post Is Unitarian Universalism a Religion or a Movement?

For more on the difference between a movement and a campaign, read the book Brains on Fire: Igniting Powerful, Sustainable, Word of Mouth Movements.  For some inspiration on starting a movement, watch the Ted Talk video Seth Godin on the tribes we lead.

FREERANGE-UU-SEALI’m very happy to see the UUA taking what I call “Freerange UUs” and, if they had a sports team, “the UU Freerangers” seriously.   Since I started tweeting approximately three years ago (via account @uuplanet) I’ve come into contact with freerange UUs who feel that they aren’t allowed to be Unitarian Universalists because they aren’t connected to a congregation.  Some have expressed that they don’t feel like they have permission to be UU in any way other than the building bound form.  My response has been “With all the authority NOT invested in me, I hereby give you permission to be a Unitarian Universalist!”  

Some of my colleagues have challenged me on it being valid to be UU outside of a congregation.  I gotta tell you, if Unitarian Universalism is small enough to be contained in our existing congregations, it is too small of a thing for me.   The Unitarian Universalist Association of Congregations — this organization is rightly bound to congregations.  But I don’t think our larger faith should be.

Some of you may be wonder, why aren’t these people connected to existing congregations?  There are so many reasons.  Here are some highlights.

  • There is no local congregation
  • The local congregation is Sunday morning centric and they work then
  • They identify with our faith, but not our present demographics
  • They are in transition
  • The spouse they are divorced from is occupying the local congregation
  • They were asked to pledge their third time at the congregation and feel the church is all about money
  • The congregational leadership is constantly begging for volunteers giving a sense that it is a sinking ship
  • The congregation is filled with unhealthy politics
  • The congregation is old and they are young
  • They have accessibility issues
  • They “married out”
  • The local congregation stinks — it happens.
  • And on and on…

I’m looking forward to seeing what comes from the UUA’s Free-range UU survey.  Even more, I’m hoping that the UU Freerangers will start organizing themselves, that a movement will ignite.  There are far more of them in the United States than there are members of the Unitarian Universalist Association.

Again, I hope you’ll share the survey.

In faith,
Peter